Status of the Summer and Fall LEGO Reviews

Just as you’ve been anxious to hear the results of the Summer LEGO review, we have been chomping at the bit to share the news with you about the results for EVE Online Ships – RifterBack to the Future DeLorean Time Machine, The Legend of Zelda, and the Modular Western Town.

Summer-eveSummer-deloreanSummer-zeldaSummer-westerntown

The LEGO Review board is still working on some of the final details of the Summer Review, which must be complete before we are able to announce any of the results. Projects in each quarterly review happen in batches, so we announce the results for each project at the same time. We’re sorry that we cannot yet commit to a date where we will share the news.

Fall Review has Begun
In the mean time, we have begun the process of the Fall Review, which includes the UCS Sandcrawler, Thinking with Portals, and the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover.

A Closer Look at Our Top 6 Most Supported Projects

Here at LEGO® CUUSOO, we don’t really know how to slow down. The Fall Review Deadline may have passed (and yes, we know we owe you an update on the Summer review – believe us when we say, we’ll announce the results as soon as we can), but already we’re looking ahead to the winter deadline (December 3rd), and you should too. We have a handful of builds that are very close to that 10,000 mark – what will make the cut?

Top5-spacemarinesTop5-exosuitTop5-andyTop5-landroverThumb640x360_2Top5-macross

Space Troopers!*
8,600+ Supporters!

It’s hard to believe this project has been in the “idea stage” for almost a year now! This project sports a number of ideas for new minifigs, and the creators are quick to point out the many possibilities for other themes that could be incorporated, as well as an advanced storyline for fans of all ages. One interesting thing to note on this build is that it has collected nearly as many comments as it has supporters. Truly a build which inspires conversation!

Exo Suit
7,500+ Supporters!

Sticking with the sci-fi theme, the Exo Suit seems to be a must have for any adventurous LEGO space ‘fig. After this build became his most popular model on Flickr, Peter Reid decided to create it as a project so others could have a chance to own it. With enough supporters, no LEGO Minifigure will have to go into the great unknown of space unprepared again…

Andy/Bugdroid the Android by Google
7,000+ Supporters!

Whether you use an iPhone, Android, Blackberry, or even a vintage flip phone, it’s hard not to appreciate Andy. With fully rotating arms and head, this model is more than just a show piece. Having received a number of media mentions, including on Brickset and Geek.com, Andy has managed to climb to the top of the most supported list in less than two months – not an easy task!

Land-Rover Defender 110
5,700+ Supporters!

To fully appreciate this build, you have to see it in action. I remember back when this was featured as in the Most Popular Bookmarks of the Week on ReBrick…how time flies! With around 2,800 parts, 7 motors, and 3 IR receivers, this supercar looks and sounds more impressive than my real-life car.

 

Correction: We made an oops – sorry we missed including The Legend of Zelda Project in the previous version! This blog post wouldn’t be complete without mentioning this totally awesome project. 

- The Legend of Zelda Project –
5,000+ supporters!

It’s clear from the Legend of Zelda project currently in review and this one that CUUSOO fans are crazy about Legend of Zelda! This project has a strong focus on LEGO Minifigures, especially a high quality Link figure as he appeared in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess.  It also showcases some high quality possible sets (my personal favorite is “The Temple of Time”).

Macross VF-1 Valkyrie +Fast Pack / Armored Parts
4,300+ Supporters! 

Whether you followed the various Macross TV shows and movies on from the 1980s, or just happen to be a fan of mecha, this is the project for you. Although the model pictured is from the show, “Space Fortress Macross”, the builder points out that the build and re-build aspect of LEGO bricks will give this model endless possibilities for customization. It’s also a project that will excite Japanese animation fans across the globe!

These are just five six of the top supported builds on LEGO CUUSOO, browse the Discover page to find more fantastic creations needing your support. Also keep in mind that just because a project isn’t in the Top Supported Projects list now doesn’t mean it won’t come up from behind and qualify for the Winter Review. Your support and sharing can aid any project’s quest for 10,000 supporters, so please pass them along to your friends and spread the word far and wide!

* The project was re-named from its original, user-submitted name, as it originally mentioned a trademark owned by another company, who  requested we cease using the trademark. For more information, see this blog post.

She stole my idea! A story about original ideas and how they relate to LEGO® CUUSOO

A few weeks ago, I attended an all-day workshop at the LEGOLAND Hotel conference center in Billund, Denmark. The restaurant at the LEGOLAND Hotel serves brick-shaped fries; for lunch I couldn’t resist putting a few on my plate. Being a good Instagrammer, I snapped a photo to show the world what I was eating.

After lunch I checked Facebook, and saw that my colleague Signe Lønholdt (from ReBrick) had already posted a photo of the same fries. She copied me! I was a bit bummed … she took my idea and posted it first, stealing the thunder I thought was mine.

But Signe’s photo was just a plain old iPhone shot. So I tightened my skinny jeans and fluffed my scarf as I scrolled through Instagram filters, observing for example how Lomo-fi brought out the rich colors of my artsy catsup splotch while Walden faded it out. I chose Hefe, wrote a witty comment, and uploaded it.

Almost immediately, an AFOL responded to my Facebook photo; “so that’s the second time today someone has posted those fries on my feed.” Aargh, I had been outed as a copycat. But Signe copied me, I thought, and mine was better!

My thunder was stolen and my faux-hipster ego deflated. I was a copycat.

Fries-signeFries-tim

But who had the original idea? Did I steal it from Signe? Did she steal it from me? Or were we both inspired to post a picture of the fries because of the trend of sharing food photos online? The brick fries are a rather unique food, but neither Signe nor I invented the brick fries. We both independently came to the same idea of sharing a photo of them; the “idea” to share a photo was both of ours.

It’s easy to understand a person who is upset because someone else uploaded an idea they had; they had the spark of inspiration and another person took it! Is that really what happened? No, someone independently had a similar thought and executed it too. I’ve even heard a few people say, “I thought of Facebook before it took off,” like they thought Mark Zuckerberg owed them something. What about Friendster or MySpace? Don’t they deserve Facebook’s success, because they did it first?

Paul Lee, a regular on LEGO CUUSOO, once sent me this Doghouse Diaries web comic to illustrate the principle.

On the site we see two kinds of ideas; original ideas (that you truly thought up yourself) and generic ideas (like a new fire truck, your favorite sports team, or even a new LEGO element that compliments an existing one, like a roof corner).

“Generic” ideas themselves are only a small fraction of the value of a project.

For LEGO CUUSOO, we see the value of a project as the Idea + Execution + Audience. It’s not enough to have a good model, or be the first with the concept. Your project should be produced in such a way that it attracts an audience that in turn shows us the demand for a potential product. Just like Facebook built a more successful social network than Friendster and attracted more users.

This means you can’t “squat” the thought for us to release a new IP or a new generic idea by putting up a photo and a description — even if the model is original. Someone else has every right to submit their own version and attract supporters. However, if you submit something truly your own, and someone else tries to piggyback or copy it, you can use the report button on the project and we’ll remove the project if it comes too close to your work.

I hope this story helps illustrate what we consider original, and what the value of a LEGO CUUSOO project is. But what happened with the brick fries? As of this blog post, I out-executed Signe. My pic got 27 likes and 13 comments, where hers got 19 likes and 8 comments. ;-) So Signe, thanks for stealing my idea. It inspired me to write this post.

 

Congratulations to the LEGO® CUUSOO Fall Review Qualifiers

As of midnight today, September 3 (GMT), the deadline to qualify for the Fall review has passed. The LEGO CUUSOO team extends our warm congratulations to the following projects that have successfully achieved 10,000 supporters and will be included in the Fall Review!

Fall-marscuriosityFall-ucssandcrawlerFall-portal2

What is the LEGO Review?
For background, check out our three-part blog series on the LEGO Review. The first post announces the quarterly schedule, the second outlines the phases of the review, and the final post shares our our cheat sheet on how to pass the LEGO Review.

When will we announce the results of the Summer Review?
We know you’re at the edge of your seats to find out which projects will pass the Summer LEGO Review. We’re just as eager to share the news as you are to hear it. The results should be in within the next several weeks, watch this space for updates!

Next Review Deadline: December 3rd
Future quarterly review deadlines will be will be early December, March, June, and September respectively. The deadline to achieve 10,000 supporters and qualify for the Winter review is Monday, December 3 (midnight GMT).

Fall Review Deadline: You’re Running Out of Time!

Did you know that the fall LEGO Review deadline is just around the corner? How summer has flown by! Congratulations to the projects that have qualified to date: Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover, the UCS Sandcrawler, and of course, Thinking with Portals. What other projects will make the cut? Maybe yours?

Now is the time to promote, promote promote! Tell your friends to go and support your project, share it on your networks, send an email blast to colleagues, even stop and tell people on the street about it – spread the word the best you can! Past projects (think Minecraft) have shown that sometimes the votes can come in practically overnight once these projects are shared within the right groups. Just remember the House Rules; please don’t promote your project in the comments on LEGO CUUSOO itself, it’s way spammy, and you don’t want to be that guy.

The fall deadline is 12:59 p.m. GMT September 3rd, 2012. Projects that reach 10,000 supporters before this deadline will be considered for production in the Fall LEGO Review. For details on the quarterly review process, read this.

Stay tuned for an official announcement September 4th to congratulate the Fall LEGO Review qualifiers.

But wait…what about the Summer Review?!
We know you’re at the edge of your seats to find out which projects will pass the Summer LEGO Review. We’re just as eager to share the news as you are to hear it. Like we’ve said before (and maybe you’re sick of hearing it), this process involves factors outside of our control, so it can take some time. However, I can tell you that an official announcement will occur in a matter of weeks, not months, and we’ll update you on the exact timeframe when we know ourselves.

Lastly, if you’re wondering who I am…

My name is Sara, and you’ll be seeing me around LEGO CUUSOO from time to time. Many of you know me from ReBrick, but check out my profile to learn more.

Link Roundup: Your LEGO CUUSOO Tips

Last week, we posted an open call for you to share your tips for using LEGO CUUSOO on your own blogs, and promised a link in return. We received five posts from four LEGO CUUSOO fans, thanks everyone!

Each post contains some great tips and good opinions. Here we’ve picked out a highlight from each one as we share the link so you can go read each post. So, check out these fellow users’ tips and put them into practice on your projects:

  • Huw Millington posted: “Think outside the box: Don’t bother submitting anything that’s remotely like what LEGO is already producing, or is likely to. Come up with something new.” Read Huw’s entire post on Brickset.
  • GlenBricker provides an excellent analysis of “relative support,” or how your project ranks next to other projects. It also gives reassurance that you’re doing better than you might think if you only have a 50-250 supporters. Here’s Glen’s chart comparing supporter count to project ranking:
Project-ranking-and-supporters-glenbricker
  • In a separate post, Glen analyzes what is a realistic minifigure count for LEGO sets. This isn’t a tip we would have thought to share, but it’s totally true (wink wink, nudge nudge).
  • Richard Hayes of BrickFanatics gives us a series of tips, and the one that sticks out to us is to build your idea (well) in bricks. The model and presentation in your cover photo is your best chance at attracting suppporters, so make both high quality if you want people to get on board.
  • CUUSOO user Dralcax shares his list of tips, and we especially like #6, talking about price range. There is no set bottom or top price point for a CUUSOO project to be accepted, but you’ll have a better chance of us accepting your project if it is a reasonable size.

Didn’t write up your tips in time to make it into this post? Share your tips or leave your link in the comments below.

Open Call: Share Your LEGO CUUSOO Tips

If you’ve been on LEGO CUUSOO for a while, you see the vastly different approaches people take to creating their projects. If you follow the site really closely and are active in LEGO fan forums, you’ll also see the different ways people promote their projects from reading discussions about CUUSOO.

We’d love to see more tips and tricks about how to build and promote your projects that can be shared with everyone. And, who better to share this advice than the very people testing these techniques on their own projects?

That’s what LEGO CUUSOO user GlenBricker did when he wrote up this article about how to make and use QR codes on MOC cards to promote CUUSOO projects at LEGO fan conventions. Since it’s summer in the northern hemisphere and con season is in full swing (I’ll be at Brickworld in Chicago this weekend), this is a great tip for any of you looking to promote your project. We know there are more great tips out ther, so we’re hoping you can share yours too.

LEGO Fans, Start Your Blogs
So, this post is an open call for you to blog your best tips for using LEGO CUUSOO and receive a link back to your blog from us. Talk about the ways you refine your projects to articulate your ideas, and talk about your ideas or what you’ve found works best in promoting your projects (as long as it’s legal, of course). Write up your posts between now and the end of next Sunday, June 24 and send them to us. As long as your post follows our little list of rules below, we’ll link to it in a link roundup post that shares the tips with everyone!

Here are the Rules

  • Write whatever tips and tricks you think are best. Keep your advice legal and ethical (e.g. having a celebrity tweet your project by asking nicely = good, setting up a black-hat SEO link farm = bad).
  • Keep your article focused on tips that help your fellow builders. You may use your project as an example, but it should be your secondary focus.
  • Your post should follow the LEGO CUUSOO Guidelines and House Rules for appropriate content and tone.
  • Please write in English. You may include a translation to another language so long as our English-speaking staff can read your post.
  • Email your link to LEGOsupport@cuusoo.com with the subject “CUUSOO Tips Blog Post” by the end of Sunday, June 24.

Disclaimer: we will link to your post only if you follow these common-sense rules. :-)

Don’t hold back (the time has come to galvanize)!